Two Field Notes Bullet Journal System

Pocket Notebook Combination

A quick rundown of how I’m currently using Bullet Journal to manage my projects.

Pocket Notebook One

  • Monthly Log
  • Future Log
  • Collections
Collections and Monthly Log
Fields Notes 1: Collections and Monthly Log

Pocket Notebook Two

  • Rapid Log intermixed with the Daily Log
Rapid Logging & Daily Log Field Notes notebook
Field Notes 2:  Rapid Log & Daily Log notebook
Typo brand passport holder
Typo brand passport holder contains the pen and my two books

The First notebook with my Collections and Monthly Log, Future Log has lasted over a year and I’m only 1/2 way through it. The second notebook for my Daily Log and Rapid Logging usually takes 8-12 weeks to fill up. Once done I swap it for a new one.

The pitfall of using pocket notebooks is that it requires me to be very concise. At some point I may need to create a Index notebook just to remind myself what’s inside.

Keep Calm and File a Bug Report

I know everyone is stressed out with Gutenberg but remember its Free Software built by hard working people who are mostly volunteers. File a detailed bug report and include all the steps to reproduce the issue. Often, it will be addressed sooner.

#IEWP Presentation Prep

List priorities to cover in each area

1978’s Commander Adama will be overseeing today’s advance preparation for an upcoming Introduction to Child Themes.

  • Introduction to a Child Theme
  • Stylesheet setup
  • Functions.php setup
  • Using the Template Hierarchy
  • Practical Examples

He’s added a few of his own priorities but I don’t think I’ll be much help in the field of fleet operations and logistics.

  • Where am I going to find cigars for Starbuck?
  • Writing a thank you note to Colonel Tigh isn’t really my expertise.
  • I personally like Apollo but I have no authority to promote anyone.
  • Lt. Athena’s classroom budget could use a bump.

Inbox Zero and minimizing my email time

Last weekend I came across another Inbox Zero post. Well, I decided it was time to audit my Email usage. What struck me as surprising was how many minutes I logged on Monday.

  • Monday: 47 minutes
  • Tuesday: 30 minutes
  • Wednesday: 25 minutes
  • Thursday 17 minutes

Unsurprisingly, as the week progressed I dwindled that number down to by Thursday.

I already aggressively apply David Allen’s Getting Things Done methodology to my workflow by automatically filtering emails to “buckets”  so I thought 47 minutes was pretty high.

As for the post referenced above suggesting you need four apps to automate your life. I can narrow that down to one app and pen to paper.

Choose your favorite email client, that’s it.

  • If you work in an organization
    • filter external email addresses to an external email folder, much of it will be spam anyway.
    • filter internal “all staff” distribution list emails to an All Staff folder
    • What remains in your inbox should be mostly actionable emails directed to you personally by a human.
      • Drag what you need to do to a Review folder
      • Drag what you don’t need to act upon to an Archive folder
      • Drag what needs review in the future to a Waiting folder, check it once or twice a week.
      • Reading or Reference material can go in either the Waiting or Review folder depending on the urgency
  • If you freelance
    • Add all your known client email addresses to a safe list and keep it maintained
      • You can then filter them directly to your Review folder or leave them in your Inbox for manual sorting
    • Filter known non-urgent emails such as newsletters, social media, and similar to a Casual folder and try to only look at it once a day
    • Anything that can’t be sorted should make it into your Inbox for quick manual sorting
  • Lastly Use a simple notebook or notepad for task logging, I like to use the Bullet Journal‘s core system. No fancy designed apps or notebooks here. Just a pocket notebook